Your Directory Tree – Neat and Tidy or a Jumbled Mess?

WHAT DOES YOUR DIRECTORY TREE LOOK LIKE?

Neat or a Jumbled Mess

Okay, we want you to think of a tree and what it looks like.

Let's focus on its main parts.

roots, trunk, and branches.

roots, trunk, and branches

Each of these tree parts can be used to illustrate the items that make up a directory tree on your computer.

ROOT

This is the main folder that identifies the file category.

TRUNK

This is the folder that identifies the main item, i.e., the year in which you translated a given file and under which you'll open other folders.

BRANCHES

These are the subfolders where you'll save your files.

Now, let's replace the names of tree parts with folder names.

ROOT FOLDER: translation_jobs

TRUNK FOLDER: year

BRANCH FOLDER: client

The diagram below shows you what we call a directory tree. What is its purpose? What is it supposed to do?

Simple. It's to help you find the client you want and then the file you're looking for − and do so quickly!

Directory Tree 1

Now let's create the subfolders. First, start by opening the YEAR subfolders.

Directory Tree 2

Next, create CLIENT subfolders under each year (2021, 2024, etc.). See below.

Directory Tree 3

Then, under the CLIENT subfolder, open as many folders as you need, each one named after a different client.

Directory Tree 4

And finally, create the client_name subfolders, namely, source_files and target_files.

Directory Tree 5

Save all the files you received from this client to be translated in the SOURCE_FILES folder − in this case under 2021 − and save all the files you've translated and sent back in the TARGET_FILES folder.

See how nice and neat everything looks?

It will be so much easier to find any file on your computer with this kind of clean, tidy organization. It's like having separate drawers in your wardrobe for different articles of clothing, each one with a tag in front identifying what's inside.

The comprehensive English-Portuguese-English AVRO dx dictionary has a working platform for translators called Systematic Integrated Translation (SIT) equipped with a tool through which you can create a unique database – containing ALL your original and translated files – that only you can access, anytime and from any computer.

One of SIT's many video tutorials shows you how to set up your own directory tree. See the video below.

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